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Policing

“I know how frustrating it can be to see headlines and not necessarily find what lies beneath them.”

Yesterday the cultural left got in a free hit with a three pronged attack by the Guardian, LSE and BBC working together to push a line that the police were essentially to blame for the August riots.

The headline of the LSE’s press release was:

LSE and Guardian study finds anger with police fuelled summer riots

They back this up with the stat:

Of the people interviewed, 85% said policing was an important or very important factor in why the riots happened.

The subtext is that the police were essentially to blame for the August riots. This is an outrageous position to take which is unsupported by facts. It is certainly unsupported by published facts as the LSE don’t propose to publish their “report” until 14th December. Any analysis of the actual report will get lost in the Christmas holidays. The headline, disembodied from any facts or logical arguments, can have a life of its own.

The “report” referred to today is no such thing. All it is is a flimsy press release from the LSE layered with sided comment from the Guardian. The LSE are refusing to publish any actual report until December 14th. Nick Herbert the Minister of State for Policing and Criminal Justice was unwise to go on Newsnight last night without sight of any real data. Ex-Met commissioner Sir Ian Blair talked about the quality of the LSE’s research. Had he seen it? No-one else had.

The LSE’s sample is 270 people. As there is no real report we have no idea who they are. Postcodes? Ages? Criminal history? We don’t know what questions were asked to get to the conclusion offered by these “researchers”. Polemicists more like.

Last night’s Newsnight was taken over by a left wing apologia for the August riots. No “report”. Just a highly edited TV polemic. Newsnight accepted a package from a third party that lasted 20 minutes. It was essentially a jazzed up interview with three unrepentent criminals (Alex, Daniel and Jade) presented by Guardian reporter Paul Lewis. Hilariously the vicious Jade, “We enjoyed it. I felt no guilt. Nuffink.”, wants to be a primary school teacher.

I wrote to the LSE’s unacademic Professor Tim Newburn yesterday to request sight of his “report”. His response was:

Dear Mr Taylor,

Unusually for a piece of research the initial findings are coming out in the newspaper. Quite a lot of data and supporting evidence is on the Guardian website for the project:

Please don’t hesitate to get back in touch if you have specific questions or queries – I know how frustrating it can be to see headlines and not necessarily find what lies beneath them.

Regards

Tim

Without irony Newburn tells me: “I know how frustrating it can be to see headlines and not necessarily find what lies beneath them.” Yes. Quite. He is doing a job on us. It stinks.

2 replies on ““I know how frustrating it can be to see headlines and not necessarily find what lies beneath them.””

David Lamy Labour MP for Tottenham in his book Out of the Ashes, Britain after the riots speaks of the need for people to take both personal and collective responsibility. He is horrified by what he sees on the faces of the looters when he watches police footage: it isn’t anger, but a happiness that suggests the satisfaction of entitlement.

In Talking Books – another programme on your favourite broadcaster, i.e. the BBC, he seemed to put more blame onto consumerism rather than primarily a hatred of the police or authority. He felt the riots were not primarily caused by race issues. It was more about there was an off chance to nick something on a grand scale by descending into mob rule while the police were still organizing themselves.

Perhaps Ealing Council should buy a water cannon which can be adapted for fire fighting when needed.

George,

I have a lot more faith in Lammy than in the LSE/Guardian work. Apparently Lammy quoted his sources and did a credible job of standing up his position. The LSE/Guardian work is basically a press release.

Ealing council certainly should not buy a water cannon. I doubt that the Met should. The Met should get itself the ability to get policemen out of bed when there is an emergency.

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