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Ealing and Northfield

Tories fighting for Crossrail

david-millican-at-tory-conference

At tonight’s Council meeting (see agenda here) Tory transport spokesman David Millican has tabled the following motion for debate.

This Council affirms its support for Crossrail and notes the myriad of benefits it will bring both to Ealing and to London as a whole. Council welcomes the continued support of the Mayor of London and urges politicians of all parties to maintain Crossrail as a priority during these difficult economic times.

This is part of a wide ranging campaign by Ealing Tories to support the Crossrail project and to make sure that this borough really benefits from the project.

At the start of October Ealing Central & Acton PPC Angie Bray and council leader Jason Stacey met with London Mayor Boris Johnson at Ealing Broadway station to press the case for improvements at the station as a part of the Crossrail project, see Gazette article here.

At the Tory conference the next week David Millican was able to use TfL’s fringe event to ask Peter Hendy, Commissioner for Transport for London, what he was doing about interchange issues around Crossrail. At the end of the meeting both David and I were able to buttonhole the chairman of the Crossrail company, Terry Morgan, and make clear the public’s demand for “kiss and drop” at our Crossrail stations. The next day David Millican was able to press for Crossrail during the transport session with Teresa Villiers (see photo above) and again raised the interchange issue with her at a fringe meeting later in the week.

2 replies on “Tories fighting for Crossrail”

And how did the Council vote Phil? Did anyone vote against this motion?

If I was a cynic I’d say that east/west public transport was pretty good from Ealing to London’s centre and to Heathrow. We have trains, tubes and buses. Bit crowded at times no doubt but with Peak Oil and Climate Change forcing us all into life style changes we’ll soon all be travelling less.

You have to ask yourself who in Ealing would actually benefit from Investment Bankers living in Maidenhead being able to get into Canary Wharf quickly on a direct train route?

Also with the price of oil likely to reach $200/barrel in 2013, all major engineering /construction projects are going to rocket in price – and on Europe’s largest engineering project the price may be just too high to continue with it. And at that point – with a National Debt of around £!.3 trillion – even debt junkies like the UK Government may find no-one in the world to lend it any more money.

Not that I’m trying to depress you….

As you know Eric this is one area where in principle I take the opposite line to you.

However what I don’t know is what the final plans will be for the interchange at Ealing Broadway station, which I read recently is one of our most heavily used stations on the system, and clearly so in an outer London borough.

There has to be a proper interchange between rail tube and bus without walking miles. There has to be a new and large bus station in the complex. There has to be a large office block or more for work over and directly around the complex. Anyone who disagrees makes me despair. And this is where the Council last year failed to grasp the nettle in that fateful planning meeting.

There is NOT in today’s world a proper bus network in Ealing which takes us to many places where we now wish to go – hence the need for a really large bus station.

It is vital that we spend money on this infrastructure, especially as the cost of private transport becomes so high and the congestion increases. It should be money well spent and create work for the developers.

Crowded trains with the massive increase in population are to me now fairly unbearable. You remember what life was like before the Victoria line was built and what a huge difference it made. We need the population to decant out of London, (and I regret this Council does not take a harder line on this major housing issue).

Because of lousy planning Ealing is dying – and without change rock on Dalston High street.

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